UK to introduce new system for ‘data-mining’ of web content

The UK is to introduce a new data-mining system for websites that publish “fake news”, in a move that comes as the US grapples with the fallout from the election.

The government will also launch a review of the use of data-sharing agreements by the companies that supply the internet’s most popular services, including Facebook and Google, the Guardian reported on Wednesday.

“We’re introducing new guidelines for data-gathering and data-matching on our internet sites,” a spokesperson for Home Secretary Amber Rudd said.

The UK government has previously been criticised for a crackdown on fake news sites, with some campaigners alleging that the new regulations are aimed at suppressing dissent. “

These new rules will provide an opportunity for us to review how our sites are being used and for our partners to be more transparent with us on how we are using their data.”

The UK government has previously been criticised for a crackdown on fake news sites, with some campaigners alleging that the new regulations are aimed at suppressing dissent.

On Tuesday, the House of Commons passed a motion calling for the government to review the use and sharing of data by internet service providers (ISPs) in the event of a terror attack.

However, a spokesperson said that the motion would not apply to “commercial providers” such as Facebook and Twitter, which are exempt from the new law.

“The Government is not reviewing the current UK data-fencing regime, but is not taking action on the recommendations of the Government’s review of data sharing agreements,” the spokesperson said.

However the Guardian report said the government is planning to “examine” its current data-protection law, which is currently being reviewed by the Home Office, the Ministry of Justice and the Information Commissioner’s Office.

“A report into the state of UK data protection law is due in the coming months,” the spokesman said.

A spokesperson for Facebook declined to comment on the report.

® This story has been updated to correct the number of “fake” news sites that will be subject to the new data monitoring regime.